Research proposal background

This Guide for Writing a Funding Proposal was created to help empower people to be successful in gaining funds for projects that provide worthwhile social service. A research proposal background theme that runs throughout the Guide is a concern for the development of meaningful cooperative relationships – with funding agencies, with community organizations, and with the people you are serving – as a basis for the development of strong fundable initiatives. And finally, I receive many requests asking me to recommend a book or two that would be helpful in writing a good proposal.

I’ve started to create such a listing of books I’ve identified and my review of each of them. Feel free to check out my selection of books to help with the preparation of a funding proposal. Enjoy using this Guide and I hope it brings you good luck as you seek funding for your ideas! Would you prefer reading this page of links in French? The goal of a research proposal is to present and justify the need to study a research problem and to present the practical ways in which the proposed study should be conducted. How to Prepare a Dissertation Proposal: Suggestions for Students in Education and the Social and Behavioral Sciences. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2005.

A proposal should contain all the key elements involved in designing a completed research study, with sufficient information that allows readers to assess the validity and usefulness of your proposed study. The only elements missing from a research proposal are the findings of the study and your analysis of those results. What do you plan to accomplish? Be clear and succinct in defining the research problem and what it is you are proposing to research.

Why do you want to do it? In addition to detailing your research design, you also must conduct a thorough review of the literature and provide convincing evidence that it is a topic worthy of study. Be sure to answer the “So What? How are you going to do it? Be sure that what you propose is doable. If you’re having trouble formulating a research problem to propose investigating, go here. Failure to cite landmark works in your literature review.

Failure to delimit the contextual boundaries of your research . Failure to develop a coherent and persuasive argument for the proposed research. Sloppy or imprecise writing, or poor grammar. Too much detail on minor issues, but not enough detail on major issues. Information for Students: Writing a Research Proposal. As with writing a regular academic paper, research proposals are generally organized the same way throughout most social science disciplines.

Proposals vary between ten and twenty-five pages in length. What do I want to study? How is it significant within the subject areas covered in my class? What problems will it help solve? How does it build upon research already conducted on the topic? What exactly should I plan to do, and can I get it done in the time available? In general, a compelling research proposal should document your knowledge of the topic and demonstrate your enthusiasm for conducting the study.

Approach it with the intention of leaving your readers feeling like–“Wow, that’s an exciting idea and I can’t wait to see how it turns out! In the real world of higher education, a research proposal is most often written by scholars seeking grant funding for a research project or it’s the first step in getting approval to write a doctoral dissertation. Even if this is just a course assignment, treat your introduction as the initial pitch of an idea or a thorough examination of the significance of a research problem. What is the central research problem? What is the topic of study related to that problem? What methods should be used to analyze the research problem? Why is this important research, what is its significance, and why should someone reading the proposal care about the outcomes of the proposed study?

This section can be melded into your introduction or you can create a separate section to help with the organization and narrative flow of your proposal. This is where you explain the context of your proposal and describe in detail why it’s important. State the research problem and give a more detailed explanation about the purpose of the study than what you stated in the introduction. Present the rationale of your proposed study and clearly indicate why it is worth doing. Describe the major issues or problems to be addressed by your research. Be sure to note how your proposed study builds on previous assumptions about the research problem.

Explain how you plan to go about conducting your research. Clearly identify the key sources you intend to use and explain how they will contribute to your analysis of the topic. Set the boundaries of your proposed research in order to provide a clear focus. Where appropriate, state not only what you will study, but what is excluded from the study. If necessary, provide definitions of key concepts or terms. Connected to the background and significance of your study is a section of your proposal devoted to a more deliberate review and synthesis of prior studies related to the research problem under investigation. Do not be afraid to challenge the conclusions of prior research.