Cooper homework

Richardson ISD with support from Campbell Soup. Students need daily physical activity to support healthy growth and cognitive development. We must continue to build an active school environment that supports daily physical activity, quality physical education, recess and cooper homework participation.

We can’t manage what we don’t measure. Designed to be more user-friendly and interactive, the new student reports take on more of an infographic feel with graphs that mimic the look of a sliding scale. The new design makes it easier for students, teachers and parents to see if their child is in the healthy fitness zone and view year-over-year progress. Contact us at 12330 Preston Road, Dallas, TX 75230, by Email, or call 800-635-7050. As kids return to school, debate is heating up once again over how they should spend their time after they leave the classroom for the day. But the question of how much work children should be doing outside of school remains controversial, and plenty of parents take issue with no-homework policies, worried their kids are losing a potential academic advantage.

10 minutes of homework per grade level. Second graders, for example, should do about 20 minutes of homework each night. High school seniors should complete about two hours of homework each night. The National PTA and the National Education Association both support that guideline. But some schools have begun to give their youngest students a break. A Massachusetts elementary school has announced a no-homework pilot program for the coming school year, lengthening the school day by two hours to provide more in-class instruction.

We really want kids to go home at 4 o’clock, tired. A New York City public elementary school implemented a similar policy last year, eliminating traditional homework assignments in favor of family time. The change was quickly met with outrage from some parents, though it earned support from other education leaders. New solutions and approaches to homework differ by community, and these local debates are complicated by the fact that even education experts disagree about what’s best for kids. The most comprehensive research on homework to date comes from a 2006 meta-analysis by Duke University psychology professor Harris Cooper, who found evidence of a positive correlation between homework and student achievement, meaning students who did homework performed better in school. Cooper’s analysis focused on how homework impacts academic achievement—test scores, for example.

His report noted that homework is also thought to improve study habits, attitudes toward school, self-discipline, inquisitiveness and independent problem solving skills. On the other hand, some studies he examined showed that homework can cause physical and emotional fatigue, fuel negative attitudes about learning and limit leisure time for children. Despite the weak correlation between homework and performance for young children, Cooper argues that a small amount of homework is useful for all students. Second-graders should not be doing two hours of homework each night, he said, but they also shouldn’t be doing no homework.

Not all education experts agree entirely with Cooper’s assessment. Cathy Vatterott, an education professor at the University of Missouri-St. Does homework cause achievement, or do high achievers do more homework? Vatterott, the author of Rethinking Homework: Best Practices That Support Diverse Needs, thinks there should be more emphasis on improving the quality of homework tasks, and she supports efforts to eliminate homework for younger kids. The issue has been debated for decades.

How it’s hurting our kids, and what parents should do about it. You can go back to the 1970s, when you’ll find there were concerns that there was too little, when we were concerned about our global competitiveness. Cooper acknowledged that some students really are bringing home too much homework, and their parents are right to be concerned. If you take too little, they’ll have no effect. If you take too much, they can kill you.

If you take the right amount, you’ll get better. Write to Katie Reilly at Katie. TIME may receive compensation for some links to products and services on this website. Offers may be subject to change without notice. Of these purposes, the most valuable in producing measurable academic gains is practice for the purpose of building proficiency, maintaining mastery or both. This is not to say that the other purposes lack legitimacy. However, in existing studies, it is evident that when homework is used to build fluency and maintain proficiency, student performance is most positively affected.

Practice can be provided via homework in two ways, single-skill or cumulative. The example about teaching a math algorithm is a single-skill format. Homework facts Researchers have examined homework in many different ways. In addition to assessing what homework practices are beneficial, they have been able to describe how and when homework is assigned. Here are some important facts about homework that one can learn from the research literature.